NEWS

    Banks Do Not Always Command The Public’s Trust

    Updated: June 11, 2019 at 11:35 am EST  See Comments

    Originally Published on This Site

    Banks are running out of time to regain public trust

    Isaiah lived in a time when Judah was struggling under the weight of injustice: “Justice is driven back, / and righteousness stands at a distance; / truth has stumbled in the streets, honesty cannot enter. / Truth is nowhere to be found, / and whoever shuns evil becomes a prey. / The LORD looked and was displeased / that there was no justice” (Isaiah 59:14–15). God’s message for them was simple: “Learn to do right; seek justice. / Defend the oppressed. / Take up the cause of the fatherless; / plead the case of the widow” (Isaiah 1:17). Later, God tells them to “loose the chains of injustice” (Isaiah 58:6; cf. Psalm 82:3), indicating that injustice is a form of bondage and oppression.

    Corrupt bank scandals are magnified by each other, loan to own schemes which destroy the small businessman on a regular basis, Goldman Sachs bankers seem to have a corner on the market along with Bank of America just to mention a few bad corrupt banks. They’re part of a pattern, lawlessness, greed, self-centered ambition, one that the American public is hyper aware of. These headlines foment mistrust in the fairness of the entire system, Bank are corrupt by design….

    It’s not exactly news that banks have seen their reputation with the public tumble since the financial crisis, but what gets talked about less frequently is what’s at risk for the industry if it can’t turn public opinion around.

    The remainder of this article is available in its entirety at HNewsWire

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