NEWS

Dutch Person Becomes The First Person Allowed to Change Birth Certificate to Register As Neither Male nor Female

Updated: May 28, 2018 at 3:47 pm EST  See Comments

A Dutch citizen born in 1961 has won the right to change the gender on their birth certificate to align with their assumed identity. In addition, judges are pushing lawmakers to recognize the third gender in the registry.

The Limburg District Court in Roermond ruled that the unnamed individual could now be recorded in the Dutch Birth Registry as “gender undetermined.”

According to the Judges; ‘At birth in 1961, this person’s gender could not be determined, and the parents decided to register the person as male, to make things easier at the time,’

Furthermore, in 2001 the plaintiff, the unnamed individual, had an operation to change their gender from male to female.

‘Eventually, it also turned out that the female gender did not fit the person, whose personality is experienced as gender-neutral, feeling neither like a man nor a woman,’ the court continued.

The previously mentioned individual then requested that authorities include a third, gender-neutral entry in the Birth Registry.

Previously, a similar case occurred in the Netherlands’ highest court, The High Council and was rejected, but the Dutch case comes at a time when ‘social and legal developments, are ripe for recognizing a third gender,’ the judges said.

As a result, the Judges ruled that an individual not being able to describe themselves as ‘of undetermined gender,’ disallows an individual to private life, of self-determination and autonomy.

After the judges’ approval of a third gender, Gender ‘X,’ it falls to the lawmakers to enact such a preposterous amendment.

Start the Discussion

avatar
A Quick Note…

Already a subscriber? Login to remove advertisements. Not a subscriber? Join the Christian Journal and gain access to hundreds of presentations and exclusives that cover today's events and how they impact you, your life, and your soul. All while supporting independent Christian researchers trying to make a difference.