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    Rasmussen: Some cities, states make homeless problem worse

    Updated: September 16, 2019 at 5:59 pm EST  See Comments

    Originally Published on This Site

    A new Rasmussen survey says something that probably will not surprise residents of San Francisco, Portland or Seattle: Fifty-three percent of American adults believe “government policies and practices encourage increased homelessness in some cities and states more than others.”

    Screen capture of a homeless camp in Seattle.

    A whopping 87 percent “think homelessness is a serious problem in the country today, with 52% who say it’s Very Serious.”

    Out in Washington State, critics of the way Seattle and other Puget Sound cities deal with the problem have started calling people “the professional homeless.” Drug use and property crimes seem to be constantly associated with the homeless population, along with public defecation, urination, and mental problems.

    Seattle’s KOMO recently reported that King County Council Vice-Chairman Reagan Dunn proposed setting aside $1 million for a pilot program to buy one-way bus tickets to move homeless people out of Seattle. KOMO is the area’s ABC affiliate.

    But three paragraphs into the story, a man identified as Stephen Sherrill offered a narrative that underscores the criticisms. He told a KOMO reporter that he had arrived in Seattle back in March via a three-day bus trip from Houston, “hoping to start a better life for

    The remainder of this article is available in its entirety at Conservative Firing Line

    The views expressed in this news alert by the author do not directly represent that of The Christian Journal or its editors

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